Oxycodone

Oxycodone and Alcohol should never be combined as it can cause dangerous side effects that can even cause death. Both oxycodone and alcohol are central nervous system and respiratory depressants, and the combination can lead to respiratory failure, asphyxiation and death.

Oxycodone is an opioid pain reliever that is available in both immediate release and sustained release products, as well as in combination with acetaminophen (parecetamol). Oxycodone is used to treat moderate to severe pain. Often oxycodone is prescribed to a surgical patient either after or before the operation. It has a high rate of physical dependency and so must be taken under strict doctor vigilance.

Oxycodone, which is used as a pain reliever has the added effect of depressing the central nervous system of the patient. Alcohol also acts as a central nervous system depressant. Thus, combing both of these, results in slow reactions and impaired thoughts. This causes more drowsiness and slow breathing. Overdose of oxycodone and alcohol can even result in stoppage of breathing resulting in death. For these reasons as well as the potential for abuse, addiction and diversion of the drug oxycodone is a schedule 2 controlled substance. Prescription of oxycodone requires a written prescription on tamper resistant prescription paper.

Before using oxycodone one should make sure to share his or her medical history with their doctor, especially mentioning any previous adverse effects of oxycodone or other opioid products, and of any prior addiction issues. Failure to disclose this information to your physician could result in a higher chance or oxycodone side effects or developing dependence or addiction issues. Avoiding oxycodone and alcohol is also important.

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